So, how to keep your website online after your death?

That’s the question that came to me after I just listened to a documentary about the crazy evolution of the digital data “La folle évolution du stockage informatique—{Documentaire Technologie HD}2, 3, on youtube.

In order to find some answer, i asked Google about it:

 

Google’s moved me on an article of Jeff Reifman, who did already a great job about answering this question but unfortunately, there is no miracle answer to it. It is still very hard to figure out a way to keep up an available on the web some information after your death. He even predict the eventual death of Facebook service due to an unreliable business plan that will eventually fail, being just a matter of time. He talks in this article of the migration he recently made to leave Facebook.

I think that a solution for that is still on its way and we are all invited, if we have an idea, to spread it to the world.

Going back to the documentary i just previously watched, from those scientist who tries to write digital data artificially on DNA and those who tries to archive some inside pieces of quartz, i have no great clue about how we could keep this data up and running forever since someone has to pay for it to prevent someone to pull the plug of the unpaid invoice.

One thing i keep remembering of all those documentaries i looked at, is that keeping your data production to it’s minimum is crucial.

Seriously, 4K videos on YouTube for kittens, is that really necessary just cause your new phone can do it?

The amount of data we produce keep going up so fast that i think at first, it should be our responsibility to sometimes cut or reduce on the archiving quality of what we put on the web or on the cloud.

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